3.17.2022

Zelenskyy Speech, Japan Quake, and the Real Saint Patrick Everything you need to know for today in five minutes.

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NEED TO KNOW

 

Zelenskyy Address

Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelenskyy addressed a joint session of Congress yesterday, appealing to lawmakers for increased aid in its fight against Russia. Zelenskyy, who remains on the ground in the capital of Kyiv, reiterated his call for a Western-backed no-fly zone—which would likely involve direct engagement between NATO and Russian air forces—across the country.

 

President Joe Biden announced an additional $800M in military support following the speech, which comes in addition to a $13.6B aid package approved last week. Watch Zelenskyy's address in full here.

 

Russian bombardment of a number of cities continues. In the port city of Mariupol, hundreds are feared trapped after a missile struck a theater where residents had taken shelter from the bombings.

 

Separately, a glimmer of hope for an end to fighting emerged yesterday, with reports of a draft cease-fire proposal circulating. Conditions include Ukraine dropping efforts to join NATO and adopting an official stance of neutrality. 

 

See map updates of the war and photos from the fighting here.

NASA's Megarocket

NASA is scheduled to roll out its next-generation Space Launch System today, preparing for a key test of the launch vehicle expected to return Americans to the moon. Taller than the Statue of Liberty, the 6 million pound rocket will be transported roughly 4 miles to its launchpad at the Kennedy Space Center in Cape Canaveral, Florida.

 

The SLS will provide liftoff for the Orion spacecraft, the vehicle at the center of the upcoming Artemis lunar missions (read more). The first launch, expected this summer, will send an uncrewed vehicle around the moon. Artemis II, tentatively scheduled for 2024, will send a crewed vehicle around the moon. The third launch, planned for 2025, will return astronauts to the lunar surface for the first time since 1972. 

 

Watch engineers stack the different components here.

Quake in Japan

At least 107 people were injured and four people killed after a 7.4 magnitude earthquake struck off the northeastern coast of Japan yesterday, causing a tsunami alert and briefly shutting off power for more than 2 million homes. Japan’s Meteorological Agency reported the epicenter hit 170 miles northeast of Tokyo and at a depth of 36 miles beneath the seafloor.

 

The quake struck 11 years to the month of the 2011 Fukushima disaster—a 9.0 magnitude earthquake, which triggered a series of tsunamis that killed more than 22,000 people, caused nuclear plant meltdowns, and destroyed hundreds of thousands of homes. The 2011 quake was 63 times stronger than yesterday’s quake. (Why does Japan experience so many strong earthquakes?)

 

See footage of the earthquake here.

In partnership with Apollo

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IN THE KNOW

 

Sports, Entertainment, & Culture

In partnership with The Ascent

> Karolina Bielawska from Poland crowned Miss World 2021; Shree Saini from the United States named runner-up (More) | Jussie Smollett released from jail pending appeal of his conviction (More)

 

> Six golfers and a coach at University of the Southwest among nine killed in Texas car crash (More) | Men's NCAA tournament begins in full today; see first-round games (More)

 

> "The Ellen DeGeneres Show" to wrap May 26 after 19 seasons and more than 3,200 episodes (More) | Former anchor Chris Cuomo seeking $125M in damages from CNN over alleged wrongful termination (More)

From our partners: It may be a good time to transfer your balance. This leading balance transfer card offers 0% intro APR for 21 months. With no annual fee. Find us a card that offers longer than 21 months. We'll wait.

Science & Technology

> Meta (Facebook) CEO Mark Zuckerberg says Instagram users will soon be able to create nonfungible tokens within the platform (More) | What are NFTs? (More)

 

> Researchers demonstrate hypersensitive fabric that converts acoustic vibrations into an electric signal; device may be used to detect subtle changes in wearer's heartbeat (More)

 

> Inland waterways play key role in transporting carbon dioxide from the land to the ocean, new study finds; results impact how climate models are constructed (More)

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Business & Markets

> Federal Reserve increases rates by 0.25 percentage points to 0.25%-0.50%, signals it will likely increase rates six more times in 2022 (More) | US retail sales increased by lower-than-expected 0.3% in February (More)

 

> US stock markets rise (S&P 500 +2.2%, Dow +1.6%, Nasdaq +3.8%) on Federal Reserve rate increase (More) | Chinese stock markets surge after Beijing promises to boost growth and keep markets stable (More

 

> Starbucks CEO Kevin Johnson to retire; founder and former CEO Howard Schultz will serve as interim CEO until replacement is identified (More)

Politics & World Affairs

> Iran releases two dual nationals, Nazanin Zaghari-Ratcliffe and Anoosheh Ashoori, after the UK settles decades-old debt; a third detainee with three citizenships, Morad Tahbaz, also released from prison on furlough (More)

 

> US Justice Department accuses five people of acting on behalf of China to stalk and harass Chinese dissidents living in the US (More) | Judge orders DOJ to hand over documents related to decision to prosecute former Trump adviser Steve Bannon (More)

 

> More than 100 people arrested in Florida as part of human trafficking investigation, including a retired Illinois judge and three Disney employees (More)

IN-DEPTH

 

The Town That Got Up and Left

BBC | Marcello Rossi. In 1993, a massive flood hit a small town in Illinois when the Mississippi River topped its levee system—twice in one month. The town's residents then decided to pack up and start over on new ground. (Read)

Endless Exile

The Walrus | Annie Hylton. The story of an Uyghur man who ended up in Guantanamo Bay, his exoneration, and the challenges he faces to join his family in Canada. (Read)

A NATURAL NIGHT'S SLEEP

 

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Just put it on your wrist or ankle, and the gentle vibrations will help you fall asleep and stay asleep. Developed by physicians and neuroscientists, Apollo’s technology has been tested in clinical and real-world studies and shown to increase time in deep sleep by 19% on average, and REM sleep by 14% on average. Check it out today for a more restful, more simple, more natural night's sleep, and take 10% off your order with code 1440.

Please support our sponsors!

ETCETERA

 

Who was the real St. Patrick

 

A remote-controlled store on wheels.

 

Spain's sky turns orange. (w/ video) 

 

The Eiffel Tower has a growth spurt.

 

An audio-visual experience of the Apollo 11 lunar landing.

 

A once-in-a-lifetime opportunity to study a rare wolverine

 

World's heaviest potato turns out to not be a potato after all.

 

Photos of dogs running the Alaskan Iditarod.

 

Clickbait: ... and now a chihuahua performing "Swan Lake."

 

Historybook: First St. Patrick’s Day parade held (1601); Golf legend Bobby Jones born (1902); Singer Nat King Cole born (1919); National Gallery of Art opens in Washington, DC (1941); HBD soccer great Mia Hamm (1972).

 

"Celebrate what you've accomplished, but raise the bar a little higher each time you succeed."

- Mia Hamm

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